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BaseN Platform now supports MQTT

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Global full stack IoT Operator BaseN announces its support for MQTT (Message Queuing Telemetry Transport), the widely adopted Internet of Things connectivity protocol. MQTT is now another option for customers to reliably push data from their devices to BaseN Platform, even when network bandwidth is limited. With this lightweight communication protocol in place, companies are able to connect increasingly smaller and simpler things. BaseN’s secure, extremely scalable and highly distributed IoT platform enables them to develop new applications and services.

With the full stack approach, BaseN customers can fully concentrate on their main business without having to take on any other responsibilities. Their trusted IoT Platform takes care of everything required to digitalize anything and to transform their business models:

  • User experience
  • Thing (device) management
  • Data science & analytics
  • Extensive Application Programming Interfaces (APIs)
  • Spime containers
  • BaseN Platform Core
  • BaseN Platform Operating Environment
  • Computing & Storage Hardware and Edge Equipment
  • Data Centers
  • Network Access

“Enabling physical things to communicate with our platform can be achieved in multiple ways”, says Peeter Talts, Software Developer at BaseN and the author of BaseN’s MQTT library.”We continuously add support for new protocols to make entering the IoT, and ultimately spime, progressively easier for our customers in all kinds of industries.”

About BaseN

BaseN, established in 2001, is the inherently scalable computing Platform for hosting billions of spimes, the core objects of the Internet of Things. Spime is the permanent logical brain and memory of any physical Thing. BaseN currently handles over one million spime transactions per second, and enables the transformation from physical products to intelligent services in any industry. www.basen.net

About MQTT

MQTT is an OASIS standard and enjoys support from different industries. It is a machine-to-machine (M2M)/”Internet of Things” connectivity protocol. It was designed as an extremely lightweight publish/subscribe messaging transport. It is useful for connections with remote locations where a small code footprint is required and/or network bandwidth is at a premium. For example, it has been used in sensors communicating to a broker via satellite link, over occasional dial-up connections with healthcare providers, and in a range of home automation and small device scenarios. It is also ideal for mobile applications because of its small size, low power usage, minimised data packets, and efficient distribution of information to one or many receivers.

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